The original site for political and provocative female artists
I was really drawn to these gorgeous lush watercolors by San Francisco based artist Emily Proud. 

Her work explores watercolor’s physical and transcendent qualities through abstracted depictions of the California landscape. Emily is inspired by geographical features, the environment, weather, and current events. She often paints outside or from photographs she takes in San Francisco and other places around the Bay Area and California.
I was really drawn to these gorgeous lush watercolors by San Francisco based artist Emily Proud. 

Her work explores watercolor’s physical and transcendent qualities through abstracted depictions of the California landscape. Emily is inspired by geographical features, the environment, weather, and current events. She often paints outside or from photographs she takes in San Francisco and other places around the Bay Area and California.

I was really drawn to these gorgeous lush watercolors by San Francisco based artist Emily Proud

Her work explores watercolor’s physical and transcendent qualities through abstracted depictions of the California landscape. Emily is inspired by geographical features, the environment, weather, and current events. She often paints outside or from photographs she takes in San Francisco and other places around the Bay Area and California.


When we think of how women were represented in 19th century art, Mary Cassatt’s high class matriarchs come to mind, enjoying their leisure hours with an afternoon stroll and a cup of tea. Yet seedier representations of the female gender were also produced in abundance, illuminating the trials of ladies for whom leisure hours were not an option at the time.
Drug addicts, prostitutes, alcoholics — these were the women who populated the canvases of many a French artist, those who wished to capture the economic unrest that accompanied fin-de-siècle’s artistic revolution. “Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris, 1880 to 1914” creates a multidimensional portrait of the Parisian woman at the turn of the century, spanning from the frilly collars of the upper class to the dirty syringes of the desperately poor. This iconic era yielded transformative artistic innovation and with it major social and cultural upheaval, leaving both men and women scrambling to keep their lives and sanity in place.


"Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris 1880 - 1940" at the Hammer Museum, LA. Jan 26 - May 18 2014

When we think of how women were represented in 19th century art, Mary Cassatt’s high class matriarchs come to mind, enjoying their leisure hours with an afternoon stroll and a cup of tea. Yet seedier representations of the female gender were also produced in abundance, illuminating the trials of ladies for whom leisure hours were not an option at the time.

Drug addicts, prostitutes, alcoholics — these were the women who populated the canvases of many a French artist, those who wished to capture the economic unrest that accompanied fin-de-siècle’s artistic revolution. “Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris, 1880 to 1914” creates a multidimensional portrait of the Parisian woman at the turn of the century, spanning from the frilly collars of the upper class to the dirty syringes of the desperately poor. This iconic era yielded transformative artistic innovation and with it major social and cultural upheaval, leaving both men and women scrambling to keep their lives and sanity in place.

"Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris 1880 - 1940" at the Hammer Museum, LA. Jan 26 - May 18 2014

nycartscene:

Recently Opened:

Spirit Landscapes
 Tracey Moffatt

Tyler Rollins Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (10W)

new body of work from Tracey Moffatt, comprising six distinct components: five different photographic series and a moving image piece. It represents the artist’s return to highly personal themes relating to family, home, and the land, specifically within the context of her Australian Aboriginal heritage. A key concept is the notion of a “return to country,” a seeking out of one’s ancestral lands and an attempt to reconnect with history and tradition. - thru Dec 21

ARTIST TALKS: Sat, Nov. 2, at 3pm & Sat, Nov. 9, at 3pm

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