The original site for political and provocative female artists

When we think of how women were represented in 19th century art, Mary Cassatt’s high class matriarchs come to mind, enjoying their leisure hours with an afternoon stroll and a cup of tea. Yet seedier representations of the female gender were also produced in abundance, illuminating the trials of ladies for whom leisure hours were not an option at the time.
Drug addicts, prostitutes, alcoholics — these were the women who populated the canvases of many a French artist, those who wished to capture the economic unrest that accompanied fin-de-siècle’s artistic revolution. “Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris, 1880 to 1914” creates a multidimensional portrait of the Parisian woman at the turn of the century, spanning from the frilly collars of the upper class to the dirty syringes of the desperately poor. This iconic era yielded transformative artistic innovation and with it major social and cultural upheaval, leaving both men and women scrambling to keep their lives and sanity in place.


"Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris 1880 - 1940" at the Hammer Museum, LA. Jan 26 - May 18 2014

When we think of how women were represented in 19th century art, Mary Cassatt’s high class matriarchs come to mind, enjoying their leisure hours with an afternoon stroll and a cup of tea. Yet seedier representations of the female gender were also produced in abundance, illuminating the trials of ladies for whom leisure hours were not an option at the time.

Drug addicts, prostitutes, alcoholics — these were the women who populated the canvases of many a French artist, those who wished to capture the economic unrest that accompanied fin-de-siècle’s artistic revolution. “Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris, 1880 to 1914” creates a multidimensional portrait of the Parisian woman at the turn of the century, spanning from the frilly collars of the upper class to the dirty syringes of the desperately poor. This iconic era yielded transformative artistic innovation and with it major social and cultural upheaval, leaving both men and women scrambling to keep their lives and sanity in place.

"Tea and Morphine: Women in Paris 1880 - 1940" at the Hammer Museum, LA. Jan 26 - May 18 2014

nycartscene:

Recently Opened:

Spirit Landscapes
 Tracey Moffatt

Tyler Rollins Gallery, 529 W20th St., NYC (10W)

new body of work from Tracey Moffatt, comprising six distinct components: five different photographic series and a moving image piece. It represents the artist’s return to highly personal themes relating to family, home, and the land, specifically within the context of her Australian Aboriginal heritage. A key concept is the notion of a “return to country,” a seeking out of one’s ancestral lands and an attempt to reconnect with history and tradition. - thru Dec 21

ARTIST TALKS: Sat, Nov. 2, at 3pm & Sat, Nov. 9, at 3pm

The Flamethrowers - Paris Review - by Rachel Kushner

Rachel Kushner is a genius. For anyone interesting in her writing process this article is excellent beyond compare. In fact, I cannot ever remember any writer breaking down her creative process so concisely. Also, The Flamethrowers is blowing my mind.

"What does all this mean? Many things, I’m sure, but for starters, it means people were getting out of the studio. Art was now about acts not sellable; it was about gestures and bodies. It was freedom, a realm where a guy could shoot off his rifle. Ride his motorcycle over a dry lakebed. Put a bunch of stuff on the floor—dirt, for instance, or lumber. Drive a forklift into a museum, or a functional racecar. But that’s art history. For the purposes of a novel, what did it mean? I was faced with the pleasure and headache of somehow stitching together the pistols and the nude women as defining features of a fictional realm, and one in which the female narrator, who has the last word, and technically all words, is nevertheless continually overrun, effaced, and silenced by the very masculine world of the novel she inhabits—a contra- diction I had to navigate, just as I had to find a way to merge what were by nature static and iconic images into a stream of life, real narrative life."

robbergirl:

ARISING
A CALL
WOMEN OF ALL AGES, FROM ALL COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD:
YOU ARE INVITED TO SEND A TESTAMENT
OF HARM DONE TO YOU FOR BEING A WOMAN.
WRITE YOUR TESTAMENT IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE,
IN YOUR OWN WORDS, AND WRITE HOWEVER OPENLY YOU WISH.
YOU MAY SIGN YOUR FIRST NAME IF YOU WISH,
BUT DO NOT GIVE YOUR FULL NAME.
SEND A PHOTOGRAPH ONLY OF YOUR EYES.
More here.

robbergirl:

ARISING

A CALL

WOMEN OF ALL AGES, FROM ALL COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD:
YOU ARE INVITED TO SEND A TESTAMENT
OF HARM DONE TO YOU FOR BEING A WOMAN.
WRITE YOUR TESTAMENT IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE,
IN YOUR OWN WORDS, AND WRITE HOWEVER OPENLY YOU WISH.
YOU MAY SIGN YOUR FIRST NAME IF YOU WISH,
BUT DO NOT GIVE YOUR FULL NAME.

SEND A PHOTOGRAPH ONLY OF YOUR EYES.

More here.

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